28
April
2017
|
07:51 PM
America/New_York

Publishers Pleased by USTR’s Special 301 Report, Addresses Market Access and IP Enforcement Issues

Report addresses China, Russia, and India, and urges Canada to revise its fair-dealing provisions

Publishers Pleased by USTR’s Special 301 Report, Addresses Market Access and IP Enforcement Issues

Report addresses China, Russia, and India, and urges Canada to revise its fair-dealing provisions

Washington, DC; April 28, 2017 — The Association of American Publishers (AAP) welcomes today’s release of the Special 301 Report by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR). The Report identifies significant copyright concerns and market-access barriers facing U.S. rights holders in key markets and highlights particular issues in Canada. The Report is a critical tool for lawmakers to help remove barriers that impede the ability of U.S. copyright owners to compete in foreign markets.

The report gives particular emphasis to the harm caused to the educational publishing sector in Canada because of the overbroad fair dealing exception pertaining to education uses, adopted in 2012. As AAP has previously noted, there has been a dramatic drop in licensing revenue for publishers and authors and a decline in textbook acquisitions across the K-12 market since the law was changed. The Report urges Canada to “reform this aspect of its copyright regime, during the forthcoming Copyright Modernization Act review, to ensure that creators are fully compensated for their works.”

“AAP appreciates the hard work and commitment of USTR and its interagency partners to highlight and address the concerns of U.S. rights holders through the Special 301 process. We are hopeful that Canada will heed the recommendations and hold the review of the Copyright Modernization Act in a robust and meaningful manner, engaging the educational publishing sector rights holders who have served the needs of educators and students for so long. Swift action is necessary in order to arrest the serious decline in Canada’s educational publishing sector,” said Lui Simpson, Executive Director, International Enforcement & Trade Policy at AAP.

The Report addresses other market opportunities and challenges for publishers with the ongoing growth of digital formats and mobile marketplaces. The report calls for the following:

  • China to increase enforcement against persistent online piracy, including unauthorized access to scientific, technical and medical journals, and to adopt measures necessary to correct the “structural impediments to effective IPR enforcement.”
  • Russia to increase enforcement of IPR, especially related to counterfeit goods and online piracy, by investigating and prosecuting the owners of the large commercial sites selling pirated material.
  • India to address the increased levels of piracy, as “India’s overall levels of IP enforcement remain deficient, and the lack of uniform progress across the country.”

The 2017 Special 301 Report from USTR is available here.

Find the press release from the IIPA here.